Google SketchUp is software that you can use to create 3D models of anything you like.On this blog you can find mostly furniture 3d models. sketchup, 3d models , sketchup models, sketchup components, .skp models, sketchup model , free sketchup models , furniture models , 3d models

In this review we'll compare four popular rendering solutions for SketchUp. The initial criteria as to which products were selected included the need for a trial version to be available, and the renderer needed to be accessible from within SketchUp, so it needs to include an actual plugin. The renderers we picked were Indigo Renderer, SU Podium, Maxwell and V-Ray.




The test scene was fairly simple, a house next to water with a boat, one of the most popular models in the 3D Warehouse that Google offers, created by Andres. The process we then go through for each renderer is the same, and is what most users who are fairly new to making renders with SketchUp would do. We first find the plugin, download it, install it, then start doing test renders of our scene. Note that none of these tests included in-depth tweaking of materials, as the purpose of the review is comparing their features and qualities out of the box.

Indigo Renderer
Indigo Renderer was the first in line, and the installation process is fairly simple. You have to download two components for it to work. First, there's the Indigo Renderer standalone software, then there's the SketchUp plugin. Once both are installed, you simply fire up SketchUp and selectRender from the Plugins menu. On the first run, it will ask you to locate the indigo.exe file. This can be somewhat of a pain if you forgot where you installed the standalone product, but it's usually under C:\Programs Files\Indigo Renderer. Once that's done, the render starts almost immediately.

On this system, to make a render of 1374 x 804 pixels resolution, Indigo took over an hour, although after around 20 minutes most of the noise was gone, and you can save the resulting image at any point. To start tweaking the result, you can go in the Plugins menu and change the settings, including the size of the render and the exposure. There's also a built-in material editor which allows you to modify the SketchUp materials and add additional attributes like reflection, roughness, bump mapping, and so on.

When you start tweaking, you can gain much better results, and depending on the version you buy, you can have some advanced settings available to you. The demo places watermarks on your images but otherwise seems fully functional. The full software costs €145 or €595.



SU Podium
The next renderer we took a look at was SU Podium, which is also one of the oldest options available for SketchUp. The installation of this one is even easier, because there isn't two separate downloads, it's just one plugin. Once you download and install the product, you can start SketchUp and render right away.

The good news is that the render only took 2mins 10secs on default settings. The bad news is that the result looked much worse. Also, there seems to be less options available, although like every other product it comes with its own material editor. The demo also restrict the size of your render, although it doesn't put a watermark on it. The full version is available for $198.



Maxwell for SketchUp
Maxwell is well known for it's standalone product, but only recently did the company release its SketchUp plugin. The installation is much worse than the previous two options. There is no setup file, instead you download a zip file, and then have to read through a readme text, copy files to a specific directory, and install MSVC libraries. Once it's installed however, it worked similarly to the previous choices. Under the Plugins menu, you select Maxwell Fire to start rendering.

The render took 8 minutes to finish, and was fairly good, certainly better than SU Podium, although no sky was generated, unlike Indigo. Also, the image seemed to have more noise overall. They do win on the price point however, with two versions of the plugin, one free which has a maximum resolution of 800 pixels, and one at $95.



V-Ray
V-Ray is the professional solution, the gold standard used by many studios all over the world. But on top of their high grade Autodesk plugins, they also offer a SketchUp plugin as well. The demo can be downloaded after you register on their site, and works for 30 days. The installation is simple, a single download file that you run. One thing I did notice however is that it slows down SketchUp's loading time.

With default settings, a render took 6 minutes, and the quality is somewhat average. Certainly it looks better than some of the previous products, but the default water is left as is, and the bright colors are as well. Fortunately, V-Ray seems to offer the most options and material features of the four reviewed products, allowing very fine grain modifications. On the negative side however is the price, around $800, depending on the reseller.



In closing, it's important to note that all of these renders were done with default settings and materials. If you wish to do high quality SketchUp renders, you would need to dig into the specific material editor of your chosen plugin, and modify them accordingly. Still, it does give a good idea of the default results, and render speeds.

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Best SketchUp renderers comparison

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Posted by SketchuFurnitureModels
Animation of restorans interior made with sketchup 8, free modeling software, very simple, very quick solution for presentations - animations



SketchupFurnitureModels
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Interior animation made with Sketchup

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Posted by Sketchup
Art Director, Robh Ruppel, explains how he used Google SketchUp to help conceptualize the look and feel of the award-winning video game, Uncharted 2.

To download a free copy of Google SketchUp, visit:http://sketchup.google.com
Find out more: http://goo.gl/VA1ZS



SketchupFurnitureModels
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Designing Uncharted 2 with SketchUp (Video)

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Posted by Dusko
There are varied approaches to using SketchUp with CAD files. This video is the 1st of 3 videos that present one method we suggest as it is quick and creates a good clean SketchUp model.

In this video we import a CAD plan, group and lock it, delete extra layers and create a unique layer for the floor plan and create scenes to toggle the floor plan visibility on and off.



SketchupFurnitureModels
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SketchUp and CAD - Importing and Preparations (Video)

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Posted by Dusko
A great starter video for anyone trying Google SketchUp.



SketchupFurnitureModels
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Google SketchUp - New Users 1: Concepts (Video)

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Posted by Dusko

 In this series of posts, I will be exploring how one can create scripted geometry in SketchUp. Traditionally, this has been more the realm of programs like Rhino. And justifiably so. Rhino is NURBS-based and can create and modify curved geometry much better than SketchUp. However, SketchUp is an easy-to-use program for working with polygon-mesh-based geometry. It also has a built-in scripting language (Ruby) and best of all – it’s free. So if you want to script SketchUp to automate small tasks or to create interesting geometry, then this may be a good series of posts to follow.
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SketchUp script clips #1: Setup and basic ideas

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Posted by Sketchup

The House Builder plugin created by Steve Hurlbut and D. Bur on the Ruby Library Depot is a very efficient tool to create a home wood frame construction processes with studs and joists. The plugin allows you to create doors, windows and even roof pitches automatically.
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House Builder Google SketchUp Plugin

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Posted by Sketchup
The Phlatscript plugin created by Mark and Trish Carew of Phlatboyz, LLC is a plugin allowing you to turn SketchUp models into a real life physical model. The plugin converts the SketchUp project into gcode to be produced in a cnc (computer numerical control) plotter. It allows you to create inside and outside cuts, tabs, folds and more. We do not have much experience in CNC plotting but from what we can see, if you have one of these printers than this plugin works really well.
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Phlatscript Google SketchUp Plugin

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Posted by Sketchup
The new sketchup plugin! Extruding and Offsettin Curved Faces!
The Joint Push Pull plugin created by Fredo on SketchUcation.com is a useful tool to use the push pull command on curved surfaces. There are times that you need to do this and the original tool provided by SketchUp will not work on surfaces if they have even a slight curve to them. Joint Push Pull solves this dilemma.
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SketchUp Plugins: Extruding and Offsettin Curved Faces

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Posted by Sketchup
Pointools has just announced the availability of a new plug-in for Google SketchUp. This would seem to be quite a statement about the level of demand for point cloud data by Google SketchUp customers.
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Laser Scans in Google SketchUp

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Posted by Sketchup

SketchUp plugin wizard Dale Martens (a.k.a. Whaat) recently released an amazing and incredibly useful organic modeling toolset called Artisan. Based on Dale’s popularSubdivide & Smooth tools, Artisan is perfect for people who want to use SketchUp to model organic shapes and terrain features. Artisan includes a set of “deformation” tools that allow you to sculpt, smooth, flatten, pinch and apply textures just like you would with a brush.
The toolbar for Dale Martens' Artisan Organic Toolset for SketchUp


Eric Lay modeled Patrick Beaulieu's "Bobby Bubble" character, then rendered him (her?) with Twilight Render.
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Organic modeling with the Artisan plugin

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Posted by Sketchup

For those of you who have not had the pleasure of visiting the beautiful city of Amsterdam for yourself, I’m happy to say that Google Earth now offers the next best thing: Amsterdam in 3D.
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Amsterdam adds another dimension in Google Earth

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Posted by Sketchup

Dennis Fukai is Director of Research and Development at Insitebuilders. He’s a licensed architect and contractor with more than 25 years of design and construction experience, and a Fulbright Scholar with a PhD in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley. He taught graduate and undergraduate courses in building construction and architecture for ten years before beginning his publishing company Insitebuilders.com.
You may recognize Dennis’ name; he’s been writing SketchUp books since 2004.Mastering the Art of 3D Construction Modeling is the title of his latest publication, which was released in March of this year.

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Great new book: Mastering the Art of 3D Construction Modeling

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Posted by Sketchup


Somewhere near the top of SketchUp's all-time list of feature requests, there's a big, bold headline that reads ANIMATE THE MOVEMENT OF OBJECTS. It's something all of us have wanted to do at one time or another. Unfortunately, it's also not something we've managed to tackle just yet. And that's why Ruby script plugins for SketchUp are so darn useful.
A while ago, I found out about a nice little plugin called Proper Animation. Watching the teaser video (below) inspired me to model and animate my very own robotic contraption. Shockingly, it only took me about half and hour to do; Proper Animation is refreshingly easy to figure out and use.
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Very cool plugin: Proper Animation (video) with tutorial

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Posted by Sketchup
Every new SketchUp release contains at least one modeling tool that’s guaranteed to save you a ton of time and effort. SketchUp Pro 8 contains five.

The all-new Solid Tools let you perform additive and subtractive modeling tasks (some folks call them Boolean operations) on subsets of your geometry. It’s really not as complicated as it sounds; basically, you use the Solid Tools to generate forms using other forms in your models. You do so by adding them together, subtracting one from the other, and finding the areas that they have in common. Plenty of 3D forms are much easier to make this way – you’ll find uses for them all over the place.

Fascinated by technology? Look into an IT online course
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Introducing the Solid Tools in SketchUp Pro 8

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Posted by Sketchup
Tim Killen of Killen•WOOD has found that SketchUp and LayOut are effective tools to help woodworkers become more efficient and better builders. After retiring in 2005 from the Bechtel Corporation where he served for 36 years in the management of engineering and IT projects, Tim's focused much of his energy on his interest in the field of woodworking.

Fascinated by the design and construction of things? Learn about an online engineering degree
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Killen•WOOD: Increasing woodworking productivity with SketchUp & LayOut

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Posted by Sketchup
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Mover for Sketchup

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Posted by Sketchup