Google SketchUp is software that you can use to create 3D models of anything you like.On this blog you can find mostly furniture 3d models. sketchup, 3d models , sketchup models, sketchup components, .skp models, sketchup model , free sketchup models , furniture models , 3d models

Make a Nightstand in Google SketchUp (Tutorial)

Nice little tutorials on how to make a nightstand in Google SketchUp.


I’m a firm believer in keeping the saw sharp.  Really sharp.  So that means you gotta sharpen the saw regularly.

But what happens if the saw is always in use?  How do you sharpen it? Do you continue to use the saw, even though it is difficult to cut with and takes much longer to cut?  Or do you take the time to stop working, and sharpen the saw?
For the longest time – almost a year in fact – I’ve been drawing my drawings up in Google Sketchup.  And each time I opened Google Sketchup, I would spend about 5 minutes setting the program to how I like to draw.  And then I would have to open screens, close windows, add materials – things that only take a few seconds, but added up over nearly a year and almost 300 plans . . . well, you can do the math.  It was time to sharpen the saw.
So I took a few hours to learn a few tricks in Sketchup and to set up my work environment to how I like it.  What do you think?
The design is pretty cool to, eh?  One of our readers, Rebecca, asked for these plans on our Community.  So make sure you go here to thank her.
Perfectly sized as a nightstand, catch all in a kid’s room, or as Rebecca suggested, a baby shower gift.
Shopping List
  • 2 – 1×2 Boards, 8′ Long
  • 3 – 1×3 Boards, 8′ Long
  • 1×10, 24″ long
  • 1×8, 26″ long
  • 3/4″ Plywood 23″ x 17 1/2″
  • 1/4″ Plywood 21 1/2″ x 24 1/2″
  • 1 1/4″ Pocket Hole Screws
  • 1 1/4″ Nails
  • 2″ Screws
  • Wood Glue
Cut List
  • 2 – 1×2 @ 21″ (Handrails, cut ends at angles as shown in step 1)
  • 2 – 1×3 @ 17 /4″ (Longer Rails, see step 2)
  • 2 – 1×3 @ 11″ (Shorter Rails, see step 2)
  • 2 – 1×3 @ 26 1/4″ (Back Legs)
  • 2 – 1×3 @ 13 1/2″ (Bottom Trim, Sides)
  • 2 – 1×2 @ 12 1/2″ (Side Legs)
  • 2 – 1×2 @ 4 1/2″ (Top Shelf Supports)
  • 2 – 1×2 @ 7 7/8″ (Middle Shelf Supports)
  • 2 – 1×2 @ 17 1/2″ (Bottom Shelf Supports)
  • 2 – 1×3 @ 12 1/2″ (Front Legs)
  • 3 – 1×3 @ 19 1/2″ (Front Rails)
  • 1 – 3/4″ Plywood @ 17 1/2″ x 23″ (Bottom Shelf)
  • 1 – 1×10 @ 23″ (Middle Shelf)
  • 1 – 1×8 @ 25 1/2″ (Top Shelf)
  • 1 – 1/4″ Plywood @ 21 1/2″ x 24 1/2″ (Back)
Tools
  • Jigsaw or Mitersaw cutting a 50 degree angle
  • Protractor (look for these in the school supplies aisle)
  • Pocket Hole Jig
  • Drill
  • Basic Hand Tools
Step 1: Cut the “Handrails”
For lack of a better term, cut the handrails from 1x2s.  If you are lucky enough to have a miter saw that will cut a 50 degree angle, I’m envious.  For the rest of us, it’s a protractor and a jigsaw  :(   .  Cut two of these.
Step 2: Build the Sides
This is the tricky part.  First, cut your slats from 1x3s with the top angle.  Cut two of these.  Then drill pocket holes as noted in the diagram above.  Be careful to drill pocket holes on the insides if you are staining – it does matter on the angled boards which side you drill the holes.  Lay out the side and clamp and glue, then screw together with 1 1/4″ pocket hole screws.
Step 3: Shelf Supports
Use 1 1/4″ screws or nails and glue to attach the shelf supports to the insides of the sides.
Step 4: Build the Front
Drill pocket holes (two per end) on all front rails (the 1×3 @ 19 1/2″).  Then mark the front legs, leaving 1″ gap between the rails.  Screw the rails to the front legs.
Step 5: Attach Front
Attach the front to the sides with 2″ screws and glue.
Step 6: Bottom Shelf
Attach the bottom shelf to the shelf supports.  A screw through the front wouldn’t hurt too.
Step 7: Middle Shelf
Attach the middle shelf as you did the bottom shelf.
Step 8: Top Shelf
Attach the top shelf as you did the other shelves.
Step 9: Back
Tack the back on with 1 1/4″ finish nails and glue.

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